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An Encounter with Pampanga

About Pampanga

Known as the Culinary Capital of the Philippines, Pampanga is located at the central part of Region III. It is nestled in between five other provinces— Tarlac and Nueva Ecija to its north, Bulacan to it’s east, and Bataan and Zambales to its West.

The province has a land area of about 850 square miles and is home to more than two million. Its terrain is relatively flat with one distinct landform, the majestic Mt. Arayat. Pampanga is divided into 19 municipalities and three cities, namely Angeles City, City of San Fernando, and Mabalacat City. It has the Clark International Airport, poised to be the premiere gateway of the Philippines and a Freeport Zone where both local and foreign firms invest.

 

Pampanga’s History

The Malay’s were the first to inhabit the province that mostly settled along the Rio Grande de la Pampanga or what is known to day as the Pampanga River.  The name “Pampanga” is actually derived from two Kapampangan words, “pampang ilog” which means “riverside”.

However it was only in December 11, 1571, when the Spaniards declared Pampanga a province; the same year when Spanish Governor Miguel Lopez de Legaspi established the City of Manila. The Spaniards called the territory “La Pampanga”, making it the first Spanish province in the country. Back then, the province covered a large land before these territories were carved out to create the provinces of Bataan, Tarlac, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, and as far as Aurora. This explains why Kapampangs populate even beyond the present boundaries of the province.

Evidences also show that Pampanga was part of the Luzon Empire or what is popularly known as the Kingdom of Tondo. In the years 1762 to 1764, Pampanga was declared the capital of the Philippines during the British invasion of Manila.

 

Pampanga’s Industry

Agriculture is the main industry in Pampanga, particularly fishing and farming. The provinces that are near the Pampanga River such as Guagua, Masantol and Sasmuan produce fish, as well as shrimps and crab that are also raised for expert. Rice, corn, and sugar cane are the main products of farming in the province.

Besides these, Pampanga is also known for industries that specialize in making furniture, woodcarving, and other handicrafts like the ones they make in the district of Betis.  During the Christmas Season, colorful and intricate lanterns are sold at the City of San Fernando, also known as the Christmas Capital of the Philippines.  Caskets and pottery on the other hand, is the main industry in the town of Sto. Tomas.

Being a Culinary Capital, specialty foods and delicacies are also found in the province. These products include buro, turonnes de casuy, tibuk-tibuk, bringhe, panecillos de San Nicolas, and many more.

The lahar caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo that brought destruction to the province is now another product of the province’s emerging quarry industry.

 

The People and Culture

Locals of the province are referred to as Kapampangan, Pampangueños, or Pampangos; they are the sixth largest ethnic group in the Philippines. The Kapampangan language is one of the major languages in the country; it is also known as Pampango or Amánung Sísuan, which means breastfed language.

Most Kapampangans practice the Roman Catholic Faith, which explains why there are a lot of religious celebrations and traditions in the province. These tranditions include the infamous Via Crucis (Way of the Cross) that re-enacts Christ’s crucifixion every Holy Friday.

The province has produced notable sons and daughters who became Philippine presidents, the first Filipino cardinal, chief justices, a senate president, and many more personalities in the field of public service, entertainment, business, and education.

 

The People and Culture

Locals of the province are referred to as Kapampangan, Pampangueños, or Pampangos. They are the sixth largest ethnic group in the Philippines. Their language is also called Kapampangan or Amánung Sísuan (which means breastfed language) that is considered as one of the major languages in the country.

Most Kapampangans practice the Roman Catholic Faith, which explains why there are a lot of religious celebrations and traditions in the province. These traditions include the infamous Via Crucis (Way of the Cross) that re-enacts Christ’s crucifixion every Holy Friday.

The province also has produced notable sons and daughters who became Philippine presidents, the first Filipino cardinal, chief justices, a senate president, and many more personalities in the field of public service, entertainment, business, and education.


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An Encounter with Pampanga

About Pampanga

Known as the Culinary Capital of the Philippines, Pampanga is located at the central part of Region III. It is nestled in between five other provinces— Tarlac and Nueva Ecija to its north, Bulacan to it’s east, and Bataan and Zambales to its West.

The province has a land area of about 850 square miles and is home to more than two million. Its terrain is relatively flat with one distinct landform, the majestic Mt. Arayat. Pampanga is divided into 19 municipalities and three cities, namely Angeles City, City of San Fernando, and Mabalacat City. It has the Clark International Airport, poised to be the premiere gateway of the Philippines and a Freeport Zone where both local and foreign firms invest.

 

Pampanga’s History

The Malay’s were the first to inhabit the province that mostly settled along the Rio Grande de la Pampanga or what is known to day as the Pampanga River.  The name “Pampanga” is actually derived from two Kapampangan words, “pampang ilog” which means “riverside”.

However it was only in December 11, 1571, when the Spaniards declared Pampanga a province; the same year when Spanish Governor Miguel Lopez de Legaspi established the City of Manila. The Spaniards called the territory “La Pampanga”, making it the first Spanish province in the country. Back then, the province covered a large land before these territories were carved out to create the provinces of Bataan, Tarlac, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, and as far as Aurora. This explains why Kapampangs populate even beyond the present boundaries of the province.

Evidences also show that Pampanga was part of the Luzon Empire or what is popularly known as the Kingdom of Tondo. In the years 1762 to 1764, Pampanga was declared the capital of the Philippines during the British invasion of Manila.

 

Pampanga’s Industry

Agriculture is the main industry in Pampanga, particularly fishing and farming. The provinces that are near the Pampanga River such as Guagua, Masantol and Sasmuan produce fish, as well as shrimps and crab that are also raised for expert. Rice, corn, and sugar cane are the main products of farming in the province.

Besides these, Pampanga is also known for industries that specialize in making furniture, woodcarving, and other handicrafts like the ones they make in the district of Betis.  During the Christmas Season, colorful and intricate lanterns are sold at the City of San Fernando, also known as the Christmas Capital of the Philippines.  Caskets and pottery on the other hand, is the main industry in the town of Sto. Tomas.

Being a Culinary Capital, specialty foods and delicacies are also found in the province. These products include buro, turonnes de casuy, tibuk-tibuk, bringhe, panecillos de San Nicolas, and many more.

The lahar caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo that brought destruction to the province is now another product of the province’s emerging quarry industry.

 

The People and Culture

Locals of the province are referred to as Kapampangan, Pampangueños, or Pampangos; they are the sixth largest ethnic group in the Philippines. The Kapampangan language is one of the major languages in the country; it is also known as Pampango or Amánung Sísuan, which means breastfed language.

Most Kapampangans practice the Roman Catholic Faith, which explains why there are a lot of religious celebrations and traditions in the province. These tranditions include the infamous Via Crucis (Way of the Cross) that re-enacts Christ’s crucifixion every Holy Friday.

The province has produced notable sons and daughters who became Philippine presidents, the first Filipino cardinal, chief justices, a senate president, and many more personalities in the field of public service, entertainment, business, and education.

 

The People and Culture

Locals of the province are referred to as Kapampangan, Pampangueños, or Pampangos. They are the sixth largest ethnic group in the Philippines. Their language is also called Kapampangan or Amánung Sísuan (which means breastfed language) that is considered as one of the major languages in the country.

Most Kapampangans practice the Roman Catholic Faith, which explains why there are a lot of religious celebrations and traditions in the province. These traditions include the infamous Via Crucis (Way of the Cross) that re-enacts Christ’s crucifixion every Holy Friday.

The province also has produced notable sons and daughters who became Philippine presidents, the first Filipino cardinal, chief justices, a senate president, and many more personalities in the field of public service, entertainment, business, and education.


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